Introductory course on the Iron Age in the Isle of Man

Image

poster

A new course on the Iron Age in the Isle of Man is being offered by the Isle of Man College. The course was intended to begin last autumn, but will now take place on 10th March and will consist of 3 2-hour lectures on consecutive weeks and 3 weekend field trips. This is a great opportunity to hear and discuss a period of Manx history that remains poorly understood.

Introductory course on the Iron Age in the Isle of Man

An introductory course on the Iron Age in the Isle of Man.

A new course on the Iron Age in the Isle of Man is being offered by the Isle of Man College. The course begins on the 4th November and will consist of 3 2-hour lectures on consecutive weeks and 3 weekend field trips. The Iron Age remains one of the islands most poorly understood periods, so this is an opportunity to hear about the latest research.

Identity in the “Road Racing Capital of the World”

Some interesting new thoughts on the Isle of Man TT Races with its impact in Manx identity are given in a new paper by Ray Moore, Matthew Richardson and Claire Corkill in a paper for the Sport, Heritage and Tourism special issue of the Journal of Heritage Tourism. This editorial blog by the editor, Greg Ramshaw, gives a flavor of this research.

Sport Heritage Review

I am pleased to announce the online publication of Identity in the “Road Racing Capital of the World”: heritage, geography and contested spaces by Ray Moore of the University of YorkMatthew Richardson, Manx National Heritage & Claire Corkill, University of YorkThis paper is part of the special “Sport, Heritage, and Tourism” issue of the Journal of Heritage Tourism, available in its entirety this autumn.

From the abstract:

This article explores the complex relationship between sport and landscape and their role in the expression and maintenance of identity. While discussions have typically emphasised the role taken by stadia and sporting venues in the development and expression of sporting and national identities, fewer have considered the role taken by the wider landscape. It is this landscape that provides the context in which many sports are enacted and watched and it is through the embodied actions and experiences…

View original post 412 more words

Finding the Real ‘St Patrick’s Chair’

St Patrick's Chair

St Patrick’s Chair ©David Radcliffe

Finding a site clearly labelled on a map would seem like a no brainer to most, but St Patrick’s Chair is one of the sites that is complex and shows how traditions change and develop through time.[1] The ‘current’ St. Patrick’s Chair, which stands in a field called Magher y Chairn (‘Field of the Lord’) on the Garth in Marown (SC3165577946), has long baffled Manx archaeologists and antiquarians. For those who haven’t visited the monument it is formed from a mass of earth and stones into which a series of stone slabs have been set on edge (see picture). While the monument has been heavily damaged by later activities, the keen observer will notice that the mound hides evidence of a roughly rectangular structure constructed from dry-stone into which three slabs have been placed vertically. The earliest description comes from a local antiquarian Joseph Cumming who reports:

Continue reading

Patronized by the Queen and the Nobility of England: A short history of the Sulby Glen Starch Works.

Sulby Starch Works c2010.

Sulby Starch Works c.2010.


A query of the Manx Nostalgia Facebook group reminded me about some notes I took (and some photographs which I have mislaid) about the old Starch Works in Sulby. As a result I thought it an appropriate to write up that research in this blog post. I hope people find it interesting and if anyone has any photographs, similar notes then please email Manx Research or post a comment at the bottom.

Continue reading